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How To Superscript In Word?

In today’s tutorial shows How To Superscript In Word and subscripts in Microsoft Word using three different tools: the Superscript and Subscript buttons, the Symbol dialog box, and keyboard shortcuts. Note that superscripts can also be inserted using Word’s footnote and endnote tools. That method isn’t included in this tutorial because the superscripts created with those tools are dependent on their corresponding note, so if you delete the note, the superscript is deleted, also. I have a separate tutorial on how to use the footnote and endnote tools in Microsoft Word, which is in the information card and linked in the description box below.

I am using Word for Office 365, which is currently the same as Word 2019. However, the steps are the same in Word 2016, Word 2013, Word 2010, and in most previous versions of the software. How To Superscript In Word The superscript and subscript buttons can be used on any number, letter, or symbol in your document. To begin select the Home tab in the ribbon. Then, place your cursor where you want to insert the superscript or subscript. Or, select the existing text that should be formatted as a superscript or subscript. For the purposes of this example, I’m placing my cursor where I’ll be inserting a superscript number 1.Next, select the Superscript or Subscript button in the Font group. The button’s background will turn a darker gray than the surrounding ribbon when the formatting is turned on. Now, type the text that should receive the superscript or subscript formatting.

This step isn’t necessary if you selected existing text earlier. When you’re finished, select the Superscript or Subscript button again to turn off the formatting. The button’s background will match the surrounding ribbon when the formatting is turned off. The Symbol dialog box offers superscript versions of the numbers zero through nine and a small collection of other superscripts and subscripts mainly used in equations and formulas. How To Superscript In Word Note that symbols are part of font files installed on your computer, so the symbols available to you will depend on the font you are using. However, all commonly used fonts such as Ariel, Times New Roman, and Helvetica should include the symbols shown hereto begin, place your cursor where you want to insert the superscript or subscript. Then, select the Insert tab in the ribbon. Next, select Symbol in the Symbols group.

How To Superscript In Word

Followed by More Symbols in the drop-down menu. Ensure that you are viewing the Symbols tab in the Symbol dialog box. Also, ensure that normal text is selected in the Font menu so that your superscript or subscript matches your current font. Now, select Superscripts and Subscripts in the Subset drop-down menu. Then, select the superscript or subscript you need from the menu. How To Superscript in Word after you’ve made your choice, select the Insert button. You can move your cursor around the document and insert additional superscripts and subscripts while the Symbol dialog box is open. When you’re finished, select the Close button to close the Symbol dialog box. Windows users can use the following keyboard shortcuts to apply superscript or subscript formatting to any number, letter, or symbol in your document.

Place your cursor where you want to insert the superscript or subscript. Or, select the existing text that should be formatted as a superscript or subscript. Then type one of the following keyboard shortcuts. Superscript is Control, Shift, and the plus sign. Subscript is Control and the equal sign. Use the plus sign and the equal sign on the main keyboard because their equivalents in the number pad probably won’t work. How To Superscript In Word Now type the text that should receive the superscript or subscript formatting, if you didn’t select existing text earlier. Finally, retype the keyboard shortcut to turn off the formatting when you are finished. The corresponding blog post for this video along with many other writing tips appear on erinwrightwriting.com, which is linked below. Feel free to leave me a comment if you have a question about Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat that you’d like me to address in the future.

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